Recent Blog Posts

New Display: The Library's Connecticut Collections

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Connecticut has an important place in the historical development of American law and government, as well as in the evolution of legal publishing. Connecticut is home to several important-- albeit debated -- firsts, such as the first Constitution and the first law reporter and legal text in the United States. The library endeavors to collect and maintain a comprehensive collection of Connecticut materials, from our oldest item – a book of statutes published in 1750 – to the current books and electronic resources that are critical to the practice of law in Connecticut.

Course Texts Available on Reserve

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Forgot your casebook? Want to compare an earlier edition of a casebook to see what has changed before purchasing the new one? The Library keeps a copy of most required course texts on reserve – we have all casebooks but we do not purchase statutory supplements or coursepacks.

To locate books you need, please use the “Course Reserve” search available directly from the library home page (circled) and insert the course name or instructor into the search box (arrow):

If we don’t have the title we need, please let our desk staff know; we will verify that it is a required reading and purchase a copy for reserve.

Welcome and Welcome Back!

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The library welcomes all of our new students, and welcomes back our returning students. We are excited to see the campus and library full of students once again!

The library is here to answer your questions (about anything), provide a comfortable study space, provide collaborative spaces and technology, and assist you with legal research and using legal materials. Last year, we answered 1,200 reference questions, checked out 3,000 reserve items, circulated our laptops and other equipment over 4,000 times, and taught 20 classes on legal research and library resources. Whatever your needs are as a law student, we probably have some way to help.

Panama Papers Database

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On May 9, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) posted the documents, known as the Panama Papers, leaked by “John Doe” from Panama-based law firm Mossack Fonseca.  Despite a cease and desist order being issued to prevent it being made public, the database can be found at offshoreleaks.icij.org.  The Panama Papers include over 11 million financial and legal records that give insight into the use of secret off-shore companies.

Paris Climate Agreement Updates: Progress and a Problem for U.S. Policy & the Future of the Agreement

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Progress
On April 22, 2016, Earth Day, at the Signing Ceremony at the United Nations Headquarters, the Paris Climate Agreement was signed by 175 countries-- more countries signed on the first day the agreement was open for signatures than had for any previous international agreement. This marks the first step toward ensuring that the Agreement enters into legal force as quickly as possible.  The agreement becomes operational when it is approved or ratified by 55 countries representing 55% of global greenhouse emissions.