Recent Blog Posts

Public Education and the Separation of Powers


On September 15, 2016, Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen filed an application for certification to appeal Judge Moukawsher’s groundbreaking decision in Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding v. Rell directly to the Supreme Court, signaling a looming constitutional showdown between the legislature and judiciary over the future of public education in Connecticut.

Other states have had similar controversy over the legislature’s constitutional duty to provide education, prompting intense debate over the separation of powers on a par with the fundamental questions asked in Marbury v. MadisonIn Washington, for example, the court held the legislature in contempt for failing to adequately fund schools and fined them $100,000 a day until they came up with a plan to assuage the court’s concerns.  And yet, the legislature, in control of the purse strings, has not even set up the segregated account for the fines required of them by the court.  How can the judiciary force legislative action?

Games and Sports Equipment


The Library has a variety of sports equipment and games available from the main desk, courtesy of the SBA and Student Services office, which may be checked out.

Balls, bats, bocce. Take a study break and enjoy the lingering summer weather.

Toss some beanbags in a game of cornhole, or just relax in the sunshine on a lawn blanket.

We also have chess, checkers, backgammon, Scrabble, and puzzles.

New Display: The Library's Connecticut Collections


Connecticut has an important place in the historical development of American law and government, as well as in the evolution of legal publishing. Connecticut is home to several important-- albeit debated -- firsts, such as the first Constitution and the first law reporter and legal text in the United States. The library endeavors to collect and maintain a comprehensive collection of Connecticut materials, from our oldest item – a book of statutes published in 1750 – to the current books and electronic resources that are critical to the practice of law in Connecticut.

Course Texts Available on Reserve


Forgot your casebook? Want to compare an earlier edition of a casebook to see what has changed before purchasing the new one? The Library keeps a copy of most required course texts on reserve – we have all casebooks but we do not purchase statutory supplements or coursepacks.

To locate books you need, please use the “Course Reserve” search available directly from the library home page (circled) and insert the course name or instructor into the search box (arrow):

If we don’t have the title we need, please let our desk staff know; we will verify that it is a required reading and purchase a copy for reserve.

Welcome and Welcome Back!


The library welcomes all of our new students, and welcomes back our returning students. We are excited to see the campus and library full of students once again!

The library is here to answer your questions (about anything), provide a comfortable study space, provide collaborative spaces and technology, and assist you with legal research and using legal materials. Last year, we answered 1,200 reference questions, checked out 3,000 reserve items, circulated our laptops and other equipment over 4,000 times, and taught 20 classes on legal research and library resources. Whatever your needs are as a law student, we probably have some way to help.