Recent Blog Posts

Staff Spotlight - Tanya Johnson

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Our second staff spotlight blog post features the library’s new reference librarian, Tanya Johnson. Tanya joined us in October 2016. She provides reference and research assistance as well as research instruction, develops research materials, and participates in collection development. She is also involved with interlibrary loan services. 

1.      How does your work fit into the core functions of the library/law school?

As I understand it, our mission at the library is to assist our patrons (primarily students and faculty, but also including the public) with research and educate them with regard to finding and using appropriate sources (without giving legal advice, of course).  As an educational and research institution, I think that providing reference services is a core function of the library and the law school.

Veterans Day, November 11, 2016

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This year has seen a lot of conflict, in the United States and across the world.  It is important to remember, particularly today, that it is because of veterans that we are able to live in freedom, have meaningful discussions to advance positive change, and exercise our rights as Americans. In the words of President Obama, “On Veterans Day, we salute the women and men who have proudly worn the uniform of the United States of America and the families who have served alongside them, and we affirm our sacred duty as citizens to express our enduring gratitude, both in words and in actions, for their service.”

In the words of Governor Malloy, “It takes a special kind of person to go to work every day prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice to protect others - we must show these brave men and women how appreciative we are for their service.  We can never do enough to pay tribute to our veterans and the steadfastness with which they have performed their duties.  They represent the very best of this country, and we are grateful for their sacrifice and bravery.”

Staff Spotlight - Adam Mackie

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Thank you for reading the inaugural entry of a new series featured on the UConn Law Blog, titled “Staff Spotlight Series.” This series will include a variety of questions that staff can choose to answer. The goal of this series is to better acquaint the law school community to the library's exceptional staff.

This post features one of the new reference librarians at the law library, Adam Mackie. Adam joined us in September 2016. Prior to joining the library, he spent nearly the last decade working and studying in Hawaii and Japan. Adam will be providing reference and research assistance to library patrons, presenting formal and informal research instruction in law school courses, and developing research materials in a variety of formats.

How does your work fit into the core functions of the library/law school?

I think my role here at the law school is to connect patrons with all the valuable resources our library has to offer and to teach something about the research process along the way.

The American Presidency Project

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With the Presidential election coming up very soon, now is a great time to reflect not only on the current candidates, but also on the Presidency itself and the individuals who have previously occupied the Oval Office.  There is a wealth of information available, but perhaps the best resource is the American Presidency Project (APP), hosted at the University of California, Santa Barbara.  The APP is a non-partisan website that collects almost every public statement ever made by a President, or more recently, a presidential candidate.  Whether you are interested in the history of Presidential elections or only want to hear what the current candidates think about the issues, the APP has some excellent ways to find what you need.  You can browse through the different collections, or you can search the entire archive.

Public Education and the Separation of Powers

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On September 15, 2016, Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen filed an application for certification to appeal Judge Moukawsher’s groundbreaking decision in Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding v. Rell directly to the Supreme Court, signaling a looming constitutional showdown between the legislature and judiciary over the future of public education in Connecticut.

Other states have had similar controversy over the legislature’s constitutional duty to provide education, prompting intense debate over the separation of powers on a par with the fundamental questions asked in Marbury v. MadisonIn Washington, for example, the court held the legislature in contempt for failing to adequately fund schools and fined them $100,000 a day until they came up with a plan to assuage the court’s concerns.  And yet, the legislature, in control of the purse strings, has not even set up the segregated account for the fines required of them by the court.  How can the judiciary force legislative action?