Under Construction: A Brief History of Construction Law in the U.S.

Author: 

In conjunction with this summer’s construction of the Law School’s Campus Center within the library, we thought it appropriate to continue the theme with a display on Construction Law and its history.

A combination of contract law, commercial law, employment law, and tort, Construction Law is a branch of law that deals with matters relating to building, construction, engineering, and related fields. While the field was not officially recognized as an individual area of legal practice until the 1970s, Construction Law’s origins can be traced to the dawn of civilization. The earliest known written laws concerning construction trace back to Hammurabi’s Code, which dictates punitive measures towards builders whose actions cause damages to others. [1] Examples include:

229 “If a builder builds a house for someone, and does not construct it properly, and the house which he built falls in and kills its owner, then that builder shall be put to death.”

233 “If a builder builds a house for someone, even though he has not yet completed it; if then the walls seem toppling, the builder must make the walls solid from his own means.”

Staff Spotlight - Josh LaPorte

Author: 

Josh LaPorte is the Circulation Supervisor for Access Services in the law library. He started working at the Law Library part-time in 2005, and became a full-time employee in 2006. His duties include managing the library’s circulation desk, supervising Access Services student staff, managing the stacks, and taking care of lots of other odds and ends for the library and law school.

How does your work fit into the core functions of the library/law school?

Our circulation desk also serves as an information/reception desk for the entire Law School campus. We are often the first point of contact for people visiting the campus, and need to keep ourselves aware of everything that happens at the Law School. We also serve as an important resource for members of the public who find themselves facing legal problems.