Recent Blog Posts

Using Library Resources Over the Summer

Author: 

Finals are wrapping up and the weather is finally warming up – summer is here. No matter what you are doing this summer, the library is here to help you.

We have shortened hours, but are still available by phone, email, or chat to answer research questions.

We also have online research guides if you don’t know where to begin with your research project. They cover a variety of subjects, including free and low cost resources, Connecticut law, legislative histories, lists of major treatises, and many more. Keep reading for information about access to Westlaw, Lexis, Bloomberg, and other electronic resources:

10 Blogs Law Students Should Follow

Author: 

The best advice often comes from those that have been in our shoes at one point or another. Part of what makes blogs so incredibly informative is the fact that they are written by average, everyday people that just want to share their experiences with others. There are a number of Law Blogs (or “Blawgs”) that range from informative to humorous and sometimes even both. Here’s a list of 10 Blawgs that are definitely worth checking out.

  1. SCOTUS Blog – This blog covers topics about the Supreme Court in an unbiased manner.
  2. Legal Underground – Even though this blog is no longer being updated, it still has thousands of posts archived, some written by law students and others by practicing lawyers in the field.

Implicit Bias and the Law

Author: 

You may have encountered the new Open Your Mind: Understanding Implicit Bias exhibit on your way into the library over the past few days.  The traveling exhibit, which was previously at the Storrs campus, arrived at the Law School on March 3, 2017, and will be staying in the Slate Foyer until the end of the month.  A reception and panel discussion about the exhibit will be held on Tuesday, March 21, 2017, from 5:00 to 6:30pm, in the lounge off of the Library’s Slate Foyer. 

What is the Logan Act?

Author: 

Is the Logan Act somehow related to the Marvel Universe’s Wolverine and a prohibition against lacing a mutant’s skeleton with adamantium?  Well, no, Wolverine is Canadian and the actual act wouldn’t apply to him.  But it does have to do with the acts that occur between private US citizens and foreign governments, so the other X-Men may want to read up.

The Logan Act has been in the news a lot lately thanks to the exploits of ex-National Security Advisor, Lieutenant General Michael Flynn.  The controversy there surrounds the communications that Flynn had with a Russian ambassador about the sanctions the Obama administration was imposing on Russia for their attempts at influencing the Presidential election.  Is what he did really a violation of the Logan Act?

Turning to the act, it reads:  “Any citizen of the United States, wherever he may be, who, without authority of the United States, directly or indirectly commences or carries on any correspondence or intercourse with any foreign government or any officer or agent thereof, in relation to any disputes or controversies with the United States, or to defeat the measures of the United States, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than three years, or both.”

Conflicts of Law Regarding Recreational Marijuana (Cannabis) Laws in the U.S.

Author: 

This post is a continuation of the exploration of this subject in an earlier blog post.

The 2016 election saw the voters of 4 states—California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada-- elect to legalize recreational use by adults of marijuana in their jurisdictions while the 5th state where the issue was on the ballot, Arizona, voted not to legalize the use. This brings to 8 (the others being Colorado, Washington. Oregon and Alaska) the number of states where recreational use of cannabis has been legalized. (A complete listing of the status of laws regarding cannabis in U.S. jurisdictions can be found here.)