Blog Posts by Author

The Passing of Linda Brown (Brown v. Education)

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Image of a young Linda BrownIn 1954, Brown v. Board of Education was one of the biggest legal victories of the civil rights era, overturning the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson “separate but equal” case. Federal government was given the right to force states to integrate their schools, which allowed children of color equal opportunity for attending schools.

Linda Brown, the young girl at the center of Brown v. Education passed away Monday March 26, 2018 at the age of 76. Her father, Rev. Oliver Brown sued the Topeka, Kansas school board so that his daughter would have the right to attend the schools that were at the time all-white. Brown’s case was combined with four other school segregation cases to be heard by the Supreme Court.

Despite the decision, it took many years of continued legal battles and protests before ending segregation completely. The end of segregation also did not end the social issues surrounding racism that have persisted in this country over the years. Over time people have continued to fight for equal rights with perseverance, hope, and unity, using the legal system, politics, and social platforms. Let us all reflect on the impacts of this case on our nation as we remember Linda Brown, and her family’s contributions to equality in this country.

Using the Law Library's Catalog

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The UCONN Law Library’s catalog allows you to search and locate materials in the library’s physical collection, as well as access a wide variety of electronic resources.

There is a persistent search bar on the Law Library’s homepage, or you can reach the catalog directly at http://s.uconn.edu/LawLibCatalog.

Image of an empty search box

What’s in the catalog?

  • Print books
  • Print journals
  • Other print sources
  • E-books
  • E-journals
  • Databases
  • Articles
  • Other electronic resources
  • Microform
  • DVDs

Staff Spotlight - Josh LaPorte

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Josh LaPorte is the Circulation Supervisor for Access Services in the law library. He started working at the Law Library part-time in 2005, and became a full-time employee in 2006. His duties include managing the library’s circulation desk, supervising Access Services student staff, managing the stacks, and taking care of lots of other odds and ends for the library and law school.

How does your work fit into the core functions of the library/law school?

Our circulation desk also serves as an information/reception desk for the entire Law School campus. We are often the first point of contact for people visiting the campus, and need to keep ourselves aware of everything that happens at the Law School. We also serve as an important resource for members of the public who find themselves facing legal problems.

Staff Spotlight - Barbara Plante

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At the end of December 2016, the law library staff bid fond farewell to Barbara Plante, Head of Cataloging, who has retired. She had been employed at UConn Law Library since April 1988. Over the years, her primary duties have included providing access to the vast library collections through description and call number placement. Jessica Panella, Head of Access Services for the law library, said it best during her sendoff; “Barbara’s work has had a ripple effect on the law school community.” If you think about all of the books and online resources Barbara has provided access to over her (almost) three decade tenure at the law library, and all of the students, faculty, and other patrons those resources have reached, her impact has been tremendous.

Barbara was kind enough to answer a few more questions about herself:

Staff Spotlight - Tanya Johnson

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Our second staff spotlight blog post features the library’s new reference librarian, Tanya Johnson. Tanya joined us in October 2016. She provides reference and research assistance as well as research instruction, develops research materials, and participates in collection development. She is also involved with interlibrary loan services. 

1.      How does your work fit into the core functions of the library/law school?

As I understand it, our mission at the library is to assist our patrons (primarily students and faculty, but also including the public) with research and educate them with regard to finding and using appropriate sources (without giving legal advice, of course).  As an educational and research institution, I think that providing reference services is a core function of the library and the law school.