Final Exam Study Aids and Wellness Tips

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With just a few days left until the end of this semester's final exams and the start of winter break, we offer some final reminders about studying and self-care. 

The Library's Course Exam Archive hosts a selection of previous final exams.  To access the archive, use your UConn NETID and password.  

Book cover for "What the L? - 25 Thing We Wish We'd Known Before Going to Law School"Our reference librarians have put together comprehensive research guides, which will help you locate sources and give you the issue overview.  Search by subject or keywords. 

Book Cover for "Law School Exams - A Guide to Better Grades"Check out our final exam course book display.  Selected from our Reserve Collection, the books displayed offer a range of topics: strategies to maximize your grades during your first year to a survival manual for the bar exam.  Read some of the firsthand accounts of outline and exam prep in What the L by Elizabeth Shelton, Kelsey May, and Samantha Roberts. 

For practical advice on improving grades, and mastering time-management and case-briefing techniques, refer to Alex Schimel's Law School Exams: A Guide to Better Grades.  

Under Construction: A Brief History of Construction Law in the U.S.

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In conjunction with this summer’s construction of the Law School’s Campus Center within the library, we thought it appropriate to continue the theme with a display on Construction Law and its history.

A combination of contract law, commercial law, employment law, and tort, Construction Law is a branch of law that deals with matters relating to building, construction, engineering, and related fields. While the field was not officially recognized as an individual area of legal practice until the 1970s, Construction Law’s origins can be traced to the dawn of civilization. The earliest known written laws concerning construction trace back to Hammurabi’s Code, which dictates punitive measures towards builders whose actions cause damages to others. [1] Examples include:

229 “If a builder builds a house for someone, and does not construct it properly, and the house which he built falls in and kills its owner, then that builder shall be put to death.”

233 “If a builder builds a house for someone, even though he has not yet completed it; if then the walls seem toppling, the builder must make the walls solid from his own means.”

Staff Spotlight - Josh LaPorte

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Josh LaPorte is the Circulation Supervisor for Access Services in the law library. He started working at the Law Library part-time in 2005, and became a full-time employee in 2006. His duties include managing the library’s circulation desk, supervising Access Services student staff, managing the stacks, and taking care of lots of other odds and ends for the library and law school.

How does your work fit into the core functions of the library/law school?

Our circulation desk also serves as an information/reception desk for the entire Law School campus. We are often the first point of contact for people visiting the campus, and need to keep ourselves aware of everything that happens at the Law School. We also serve as an important resource for members of the public who find themselves facing legal problems.

Using Library Resources Over the Summer

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Finals are wrapping up and the weather is finally warming up – summer is here. No matter what you are doing this summer, the library is here to help you.

We have shortened hours, but are still available by phone, email, or chat to answer research questions.

We also have online research guides if you don’t know where to begin with your research project. They cover a variety of subjects, including free and low cost resources, Connecticut law, legislative histories, lists of major treatises, and many more. Keep reading for information about access to Westlaw, Lexis, Bloomberg, and other electronic resources:

Staff Spotlight - Barbara Plante

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At the end of December 2016, the law library staff bid fond farewell to Barbara Plante, Head of Cataloging, who has retired. She had been employed at UConn Law Library since April 1988. Over the years, her primary duties have included providing access to the vast library collections through description and call number placement. Jessica Panella, Head of Access Services for the law library, said it best during her sendoff; “Barbara’s work has had a ripple effect on the law school community.” If you think about all of the books and online resources Barbara has provided access to over her (almost) three decade tenure at the law library, and all of the students, faculty, and other patrons those resources have reached, her impact has been tremendous.

Barbara was kind enough to answer a few more questions about herself:

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