Final Exam Study Aids and Wellness Tips

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With just a few days left until the end of this semester's final exams and the start of winter break, we offer some final reminders about studying and self-care. 

The Library's Course Exam Archive hosts a selection of previous final exams.  To access the archive, use your UConn NETID and password.  

Book cover for "What the L? - 25 Thing We Wish We'd Known Before Going to Law School"Our reference librarians have put together comprehensive research guides, which will help you locate sources and give you the issue overview.  Search by subject or keywords. 

Book Cover for "Law School Exams - A Guide to Better Grades"Check out our final exam course book display.  Selected from our Reserve Collection, the books displayed offer a range of topics: strategies to maximize your grades during your first year to a survival manual for the bar exam.  Read some of the firsthand accounts of outline and exam prep in What the L by Elizabeth Shelton, Kelsey May, and Samantha Roberts. 

For practical advice on improving grades, and mastering time-management and case-briefing techniques, refer to Alex Schimel's Law School Exams: A Guide to Better Grades.  

Thriving at UConn Law

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Everyone loves Fall- the leaves are changing, the air is crisp, and there are apple cider donuts around every corner. Unfortunately for law students, Fall is also when coursework begins to pile up and deadlines start to feel more imminent than the first hard frost. For 1L’s, this time of year is also means preparing for Mock Trial competitions and the beginning of commitments to other extra-curricular activities. On top of that, first year students might find that sitting down to outline for the first time feels a bit like getting lost in a corn maze.

Luckily for students at UConn Law, the library and administrative staff have seen it all before and have prepared resources to help students power through the tough Fall season.  In addition to exam preparation sessions (keep an eye on your email inboxes) and access to research librarians, “Thriving at UConn Law” is a new LibGuide on the library website that is designed to help keep your academic and personal life on track. The guide is broken down into three simple topics: mindfulness and stress relief, productivity, and healthy living. Each of these pages contains a curated list of quick tips, books, and other practical advice for staying on top of your game. If you checked out the guide at the beginning of the semester, pop back in for updates and even more helpful tips. Check it out at: http://libguides.law.uconn.edu/thrive

Using the Law Library's Catalog

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The UCONN Law Library’s catalog allows you to search and locate materials in the library’s physical collection, as well as access a wide variety of electronic resources.

There is a persistent search bar on the Law Library’s homepage, or you can reach the catalog directly at http://s.uconn.edu/LawLibCatalog.

What’s in the catalog?

  • Print books
  • Print journals
  • Other print sources
  • E-books
  • E-journals
  • Databases
  • Articles
  • Other electronic resources
  • Microform
  • DVDs

This Year's Orientation Book: "Just Mercy" by Bryan Stevenson

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This year, all incoming students read Bryan Stevenson’s Just Mercy, a memoir recounting the author’s legal career representing death row inmates, juveniles sentenced to life imprisonment, people with mental illness, and others. In telling the stories of individuals’ interactions with the criminal justice system, Stevenson exposes the ongoing problems of racism, inadequate legal representation, and mass incarceration.

Stevenson’s recent project is creating the country’s first memorial to the victims of lynching, to be constructed in Montgomery, Alabama. His organization, the Equal Justice Initiative, has spent years researching reports of lynchings, and have been able to document over 4,000 between 1877 and 1950. He connects the current racial disparities in capital punishment with lynchings that occurred into the twentieth century. He is not alone in this view; a recent book, Courting Death: the Supreme Court and Capital Punishment (available in the library), makes the same connection.

Using Library Resources Over the Summer

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Finals are wrapping up and the weather is finally warming up – summer is here. No matter what you are doing this summer, the library is here to help you.

We have shortened hours, but are still available by phone, email, or chat to answer research questions.

We also have online research guides if you don’t know where to begin with your research project. They cover a variety of subjects, including free and low cost resources, Connecticut law, legislative histories, lists of major treatises, and many more. Keep reading for information about access to Westlaw, Lexis, Bloomberg, and other electronic resources:

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